Grain Engulfment Near-Miss

Today I’m sharing an article from Farm Progress about a farmer who survived being engulfed in a grain bin. There have been several fatal engulfments already this year, and as the article states around 50% of engulfments are fatal. The main factors that made this case a near miss were that other people were working nearby. No one should enter a grain bin without a second person there who is not in the grain and can get help, but fortunately in this case there were at least other people within earshot. Since the farmer’s leg was low enough in the bin that it was near the auger, it also sounds like the bin wasn’t full enough to completely submerge him. A third factor that helped was that the fire department was able to respond quickly and had a grain rescue system. More and more fire departments are investing in plastic barricades that help more grain from falling in and grain vacuums, plus the training to use them properly. However, there are still many rural fire departments who aren’t ready to respond to an engulfment.

Anyone who is cleaning and refilling bins needs to be especially careful given the late planting and wet conditions so far this year. Wet grain is more likely to form crusts which can either cause a hollow space to form under a surface layer resulting in a fall-through type engulfment or to cause grain to stick to the sides of the bin resulting in an avalanche-style engulfment. Engulfments are preventable. The UMASH grain safety checklist (link provided below) is a good starting point. Developing bin entry procedures that are appropriate to the type of bin being used and following them every single time someone enters the bin is key to preventing engulfment. Keeping kids out of grain bins is also important. A lot of kids are tempted by the idea of climbing and playing in grain so it is important to be sure that they don’t have access to bins or ladders.

Here is the link to the UMASH grain safety checklist:

http://umash.umn.edu/farm-safety-check-grain-handling-safety/

For the original article by farm progress click here:

https://www.farmprogress.com/safety/rescue-grain-bin-sets-farmer-right-course?fbclid=IwAR2leLAaU07N2O2mkHx06hdR2m1G7i7m0q3Ly8Ksvr54zqmwg2fXPwo65vU

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ATV Safety Checklist from UC Davis

Here is an ATV safety checklist that was published by UC Davis. ATVs are one of the most dangerous vehicles on farms, and many of the injuries and fatalities happen to children. Often, kids and teenagers are injured when they are riding for fun and not when they are doing farm work. They ride too fast on terrain where ATVs should not be used such as steep slopes and on roads. Using an ATV that is too big for the rider also causes problems because children do not have enough body mass to lean and balance out the weight of an adult-sized ATV. Smaller adults might also want to consider a smaller model.

Another thing that helps prevent ATV injuries is helmet use. It’s important that riders wear the correct size helmet, and that helmets are replaced if they experience even a small impact. You can also consider adding a roll bar. Like with tractors, many ATV fatalities happen when the vehicle rolls over on to the rider, and unlike tractor roll bars, many ATV roll bars can be installed at home.

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You can check out the original article here:


https://aghealth.ucdavis.edu/news/atv-safety?fbclid=IwAR2SM0ZC1ocETASR4BeqRBfGGeQi4NKw_Bs81XHTgGrqj3vlP-JHfmUmJK0